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Your understanding is correct. Out of the box, you can receive an OpenID Connect id token if you request openid scope but you have limited control over non-standard claims in this token. If you need your own claims in your own format, you'll need to perform a token exchange as a 2-step process: Your oAuth client acquires an access token from SF using one of ...


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You may be able to set custom claims via the JWT Class if you are creating your own Authentication Provider in Salesforce.


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In general, for oauth to work, the user needs to authorise salesforce to perform requests on their behalf. If you haven't done it already, I suggest you go through the documentation on the many different types of oauth flows, and see if one of them fits your scenario. https://help.salesforce.com/articleView?id=remoteaccess_authenticate_overview.htm ...


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You're creating a token that expires in 5 seconds from 'now' and by the time it arrives at the destination, it has expired, thus the error message. When you call setValidityLength(...), you're setting the value of the exp (expiration) claim. The format of expiration claim is number of seconds elapsed since epoch. From RFC 7519 4.1.4. "exp" (Expiration ...


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The root cause was that the OAuth Access Token returned by our own Keycloak AuthServer returned was too complex, lengthy. Salesforce is currently not able to handle it. This was assessed and confirmed by Salesforce.com. They just used https://jwt.io/ to decyper one of our acccess tokens an saw a lot of useless stuff in there. By reducing access_token size (...


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