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Salesforce does not publish information about which version of OpenSSL they use (or if they use an alternative). Even if they did, we have no way of choosing which version Salesforce uses. Salesforce is a "managed" platform, meaning that they take responsibility for keeping the various bits and pieces updated (and more crucially, that these updates ...


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I have not faced this issue recently, but because you mentioned the change on root CA (root Certification Authority), I suggest you check the Salesforce article that explains about certificates. Especially the part of /cacerts.jsp to your instance URL and compare with the server certificate that Salesforce is communicating with. Also, check if the whole ...


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The certificate chain this external endpoint is using is broken (which they would need to fix, it's not something we can take care of on the Salesforce side), or they're using a root CA that doesn't appear on Salesforce's list of trusted certs. There's not much you could do about a non-trusted root certificate, and the certificate chain thing is just a ...


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Without seeing the error message or response status that you get in Apex, I'm going to take guesses. Here are some things you can try: Make sure that the target endpoint URL is added in Setup > Remote Site Settings. Try to add a Content-Type header to your post request (Postman may be doing this automatically). You should be able to send the blog without ...


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For others having the same issue you could be missing the security token: For access via the API or client app, if the Multi-Factor Authentication on API Logins permission is set on the user profile, users enter a TOTP verification code generated by an authenticator app. If the permission isn’t set, users must add their security token to the end of their ...


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You simply need to ensure that this "integration user" is set with the "API Only" permission: API Only - Specifies that the user can only log in through the API. This prevents the user from being used for any purpose other than integration scenarios


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The External ID concept is primarily meant for use with systems that cannot use custom external identifiers of their own to reference Salesforce records, and also generate data that is bound for Salesforce. If you can use a Salesforce ID in the external system, you can certainly use the Salesforce ID from the external system to update Salesforce records. ...


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There is nothing insecure about sending the Salesforce Id out to another system to use as an identifier there. You can generate your own External Id that both systems will use if you prefer, but either approach is valid and commonly used.


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